Snarkitecture x Supper

Alexander Buckeridge

Firstly, it’s cool to be sharing space again, having both been under the same roof — you working for Daniel Arsham Studio and me at Snarkitecture. Can you share your transition from working at Daniel Arsham Studio to co-founding Supper?

Austin Snyder

Funny how it comes full circle! I’ve been super fortunate to have worked with Daniel and the studio for the last seven years, being a part of so many amazing projects and collaborations in a variety of capacities. It was always my goal to eventually create my own studio, taking all that I’ve learned and building on that in my own way. With the support of the studio, I am happy to be here today to continue this with my own team.

Alexander Buckeridge

What inspired the name “Supper” and what significance does it hold for your brand?

Austin Snyder

My two partners and I had struggled for a while to put a name on the studio and came up with a few others but Supper stuck! First, we are all from the Midwest (Cleveland / Detroit). Trying to come up with words unique to that part of the country, I thought of supper – which was what we always called dinner growing up. It resonated with everyone so we leaned into it and here we are. I like things that don’t semiotically match up with what they represent – creating distance between the name and the actual thing – so it checked off both of those boxes for us. 

Alexander Buckeridge

How has your background shaped your approach to design in your current ventures at Supper?

Austin Snyder

Even down to the name, our midwestern roots come through in a variety of ways – sometimes subconsciously.  

Alexander Buckeridger

Balancing the creative aspects of your work with running a successful business can be challenging. How do you navigate this balance between creativity and the practical aspects of managing Supper?

Austin Snyder

It’s never an easy task, but understanding your own (+ the team’s) strengths and weaknesses is the first step. Identify what you are good at and what you are not – and then put the correct people in the roles that highlight their strengths. This, on top of constant / open discussion on what is working and potential areas of improvement for the team is critical. It takes a lot to admit you are not good at something, but everyone benefits from it.

Alexander Buckeridge

Where do you find inspiration, and how do you channel it to drive creativity within Supper?

Austin Snyder

Inspiration can be found everywhere! Travel has been a huge influence, experiencing things outside of your daily life. We try to prioritize out of the studio trips as much as possible – whether that is to the local bookstore or a museum just to spark some ideas. I’ve been a Tumblr fan since high school, too and continue to use that daily. Input equals output, so just continue to surround yourself with a variety of mixed media and influences. 

Alexander Buckeridge

Collaboration has been pivotal in your career. How do you approach collaborations, and what do you believe are the keys to successful partnerships?

Austin Snyder

It needs to make sense and have some overlap between the two parties. Forcing something inorganic or for purely financial gain feels inauthentic, and consumers are smart enough to tell the difference. 

Alexander Buckeridge

Can you share a standout project or campaign that exemplifies your studio’s creative ethos and approach to branding?

Austin Snyder

Recently we finished the brand identity for ALEO, a hotel-concept in Detroit that is housed within a deconsecrated church’s rectory. 

Alexander Buckeridge

Can you discuss the impact of technology on branding and design? How does Supper integrate technology to enhance brand experiences and engagement?

Austin Snyder

AI (the hot topic du jour) can be a really beneficial tool to use in brainstorming and fleshing out a half-baked idea, but it is never the end result. There is a massive difference between idea and execution – one that AI tools cannot decipher. Great visuals to represent an idea go really far until you have to execute and build something – then they fall flat. This divide makes expertise / know-how in production even more valuable when actually bringing experiences to life. Without it, these ideas will only stay in the digital realm.